#GoogleCloudSummit 2017 in Munich

While Amazon Web Services reported another record quarter with $4,53B in October 2017, and Microsoft reporting 93% growth of their cloud business, Google is the third major player in the market for cloud services.

At the same time, Google is not (yet) explicitly reporting numbers on their cloud offering. However, “all other” businesses, including Play Store,  also showed impressive 42% growth recently.

To demonstrate how serious the company is about their cloud products, Google demonstrated their commitment in roadshows, the Google Cloud Summit. Among others, like in Paris or Singapore, the Summit was held in Munich On December 6th in the MOC Munich.

Following a keynote between 9am an 11am, Google prepared 4 tracks covering diverse, cloud oriented topics in the areas of Application Development, Big Data & Machine Learning, Infrastructure & Operations, Startup. These tracks had continuous talks between 11am and 6pm, touching all topics from the field you could think of, starting with containers, docker and Kubernetes, going over IoT and Industry 4.0, touching Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning, to Data Loss Protection and GDPR. All that along with Innovation and Agility in the context of security and privacy.

To round up the event,  outside the track rooms had an exhibition of selected cloud partners, from consultancy to implementation service, but also SaaS offerings leveraging the Google Cloud Platform.

While the market news seem that Google is late to the game, their commitment and quality of offering surely put them in an interesting spot and an alternative to the other two cloud vendors. The cloud summit definitely answered questions on Googles capabilities.

Is cloud computing truly, truly disruptive?

“Disruption” is one of those words that has been overused, being applied to every little product or service that comes to market, or every new company that emerges. Cloud computing and digital technologies, for example, are branded by many as “disruptive.” New services and business models sweeping through markets, such as Uber and Airbnb, are […]

Turns out, no, the cloud itself ain’t disruptive. But the availability of on-demand computing resources enables businesses to come up with ideas more easily and the service based approach disrupts businesses.
via: Is cloud computing truly, truly disruptive?

Dilbert nailed it.

Boss: Wally, did you Uberize the slide deck?

Wally: I harmonized it in the cloud.

Boss: Are we ready for a trans-domain kick-off?

Wally: I put a disruptive mesh network in the microservices of the Internet of things.

Boss: Will that be good enough to “ask the fridge” or do I need to start disintermediating?

Wally: It depends on if we have enough bandwidth to growth-hack the analytics.

Boss: I just hope our clicks-and-mortar strategy staircases.

Dilbert: I’m almost certain that was nonsense.

Wally: Sometimes it’s about the journey.

You can’t have more cloud than this.

via: Dilbert Comic Strip on 2015-12-20 | Dilbert by Scott Adams

AWS in Plain English

You develop apps and want to move to the cloud? You may start looking at Amazon Web Services (AWS), but are confused? ExpeditedSSL translates the names for you. Priceless.

But with 50 plus opaquely named services, we decided that enough was enough and that some plain english descriptions were needed.

via: AWS in Plain English